Could coffee be the secret to fighting obesity?

Top News in Internal Medicine

Could coffee be the secret to fighting obesity?

MedicalXpress Breaking News-and-Events | June 24, 2019

Scientists from the University of Nottingham have discovered that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate “brown fat,” the body’s own fat-fighting defenses, which could be the key to tackling obesity and diabetes.

The pioneering study, published today in the journal Scientific Reports, is one of the first to be carried out in humans to find components which could have a direct effect on how “brown fat” functions, an important part of the human body that plays a key role in how quickly we can burn calories as energy.

Brown adipose tissue (BAT), also known as brown fat, is one of two types of fat found in humans and other mammals. Initially only attributed to babies and hibernating mammals, it was discovered in recent years that adults can have brown fat too. Its main function is to generate body heat by burning calories (as opposed to white fat, which is a result of storing excess calories). People with a lower body mass index (BMI), therefore, have a higher amount of brown fat.

Professor Michael Symonds, from the School of Medicine at the University of Nottingham, who co-directed the study said, “Brown fat works in a different way to other fat in your body and produces heat by burning sugar and fat, often in response to cold. Increasing its activity improves blood sugar control as well as improving blood lipid levels, and the extra calories burnt help with weight loss. However, until now, no one has found an acceptable way to stimulate its activity in humans.

“This is the first study in humans to show that something like a cup of coffee can have a direct effect on our brown fat functions. The potential implications of our results are pretty big, as obesity is a major health concern for society and we also have a growing diabetes epidemic, and brown fat could potentially be part of the solution in tackling them.”

The team started with a series of stem cell studies to see if caffeine would stimulate brown fat. Once they had found the right dose, they then moved on to humans to see if the results were similar.

The team used a thermal imaging technique, which they’d previously pioneered, to trace the body’s brown fat reserves. The non-invasive technique helps the team to locate brown fat and assess its capacity to produce heat.

“From our previous work, we knew that brown fat is mainly located in the neck region, so we were able to image someone straight after they had a drink to see if the brown fat got hotter,” said Symonds.

“The results were positive and we now need to ascertain that caffeine as one of the ingredients in the coffee is acting as the stimulus or if there’s another component helping with the activation of brown fat. We are currently looking at caffeine supplements to test whether the effect is similar.

Once we have confirmed which component is responsible for this, it could potentially be used as part of a weight management regime or as part of glucose regulation program to help prevent diabetes.”

Oestrogen protects against macular degeneration.

It never ceases to amaze me about the benefits oestrogen has for women. Here is research showing another health benefit from oestrogen.

Review ARTICLE

Front. Endocrinol., 02 March 2018 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2018.00066

Gonadal Hormones and Retinal Disorders: A Review

Raffaele Nuzzi1*, Simona Scalabrin1, Alice Becco1 and Giancarlo Panzica2,3

  • 1Eye Clinic, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
  • 2Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Department of Neuroscience Rita Levi-Montalcini, University of Torino, Torino, Italy
  • 3Neuroscience Institute Cavalieri-Ottolenghi (NICO), Orbassano, Italy

Aim: Gonadal hormones are essential for reproductive function, but can act on neural and other organ systems, and are probably the cause of the large majority of known sex differences in function and disease. The aim of this review is to provide evidence for this hypothesis in relation to eye disorders and to retinopathies in particular.

Methods: Epidemiological studies and research articles were reviewed.

Results: Analysis of the biological basis for a relationship between eye diseases and hormones showed that estrogen, androgen, and progesterone receptors are present throughout the eye and that these steroids are locally produced in ocular tissues. Sex hormones can have a neuroprotective action on the retina and modulate ocular blood flow. There are differences between the male and the female retina; moreover, sex hormones can influence the development (or not) of certain disorders. For example, exposure to endogenous estrogens, depending on age at menarche and menopause and number of pregnancies, and exposure to exogenous estrogens, as in hormone replacement therapy and use of oral contraceptives, appear to protect against age-related macular degeneration (both drusenoid and neurovascular types), whereas exogenous testosterone therapy is a risk factor for central serous chorioretinopathy. Macular hole is more common among women than men, particularly in postmenopausal women probably owing to the sudden drop in estrogen production in later middle age. Progestin therapy appears to ameliorate the course of retinitis pigmentosa. Diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes, may be more common among men than women.

Conclusion: We observed a correlation between many retinopathies and sex, probably as a result of the protective effect some gonadal hormones may exert against the development of certain disorders. This may have ramifications for the use of hormone therapy in the treatment of eye disease and of retinal disorders in particular.

Introduction

There is a growing body of evidence for the importance of gonadal hormone action in the function of the reproductive and other systems (1), including bone (2) and cardiovascular system. Sex hormones (androgenic, estrogenic, and progestinic) are produced by both sexes, though the quantity and mode differ by sex and age. Moreover, they are produced, not only by the gonads, but also by other organs (3, 4), including the central nervous system (CNS) in which estrogens are thought to exert a neuroprotective role (5, 6).

Historically, interactions between gonadal hormones and the eye have received scarce attention; however, recent research into sex-related differences has begun to reveal possible links between estrogens and eye diseases, i.e., glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and cataracts. This has carried over into the evaluation of the implications that postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and anti-estrogenic therapy in breast cancer could have for concomitant eye disorders (7).

Since, research in this area is still at its beginning, the available studies are few and often limited in sample size; this does not allow to reach a univocal and definitive answer about the relationship between sex, sex hormones, and ocular pathologies. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to summarize the results currently present in the literature.

Natural ways to prevent deadly diseases

I have returned to work after my 4 weeks holiday. It was very relaxing, mostly at home due to the virus, but was very good. The main changes for this year have been to reduce my work hours slightly, not taking on new patients (unfortunately) but otherwise will continue working as usual.

Natural ways to prevent deadly diseases

Naveed Saleh, MD, MS|January 8, 2021

Chronic diseases are defined as physical or mental health conditions that last more than one year and result in functional restrictions or ongoing treatment and monitoring. These diseases are among the most frequent and costly in the United States, with about half of Americans diagnosed with at least one chronic condition.Older man walking outside

Studies show that walking is just one of many healthy steps you can take to prevent chronic disease.

Despite advances in healthcare and breakthroughs in medicine, the prevalence of chronic disease in the United States is on the rise, with more people developing diabetes, hypertension, stroke, heart disease, obesity, and others. Chronic disease results in death, disability, and decreased quality of life.

“Trends show an overall increase in chronic diseases,” wrote the authors of a study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. “The nation’s aging population, coupled with existing risk factors (tobacco use, poor nutrition, lack of physical activity) and medical advances that extend longevity (if not also improve overall health), have led to the conclusion that these problems are only going to magnify if not effectively addressed now.”ADVERTISEMENT -SCROLL TO KEEP READING

Fortunately, there are natural steps that can be taken to decrease your risk of chronic disease. Here’s a look at five natural interventions. 

Ditch ultraprocessed foods

It’s true that ultraprocessed foods make for easier food choices. But, in this case, easier is definitely not healthier. Previous cohort studies have shown that the consumption of ultraprocessed foods—including chips, white bread, cookies, and soda—is linked to higher rates of cancer, irritable bowel syndrome, hypertension, and obesity.

Results from a population-based Spanish study indicated that eating four or more servings of ultraprocessed foods each day was related to a 62% increased hazard for all-cause mortality, with each additional serving increasing hazard by 18%.

Ultraprocessed foods lead to chronic inflammation which plays a role in diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Instead of ultraprocessed foods, eat whole grains, nuts, seeds, fruits, and vegetables. Adopting a Mediterranean diet pattern is also recommended.

Start stepping

Exercise boosts overall health, fitness, and quality of life, as well as decreases the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, dementia, anxiety, depression, and various cancers.

When most people ponder exercise, they imagine the gym or a structured class. But for chronic disease prevention, all that really matters is frequency and intensity. Simply walking can be a great way to reap the health reward of physical activity.

According to the Cleveland Clinic, “Taking 10,000 steps a day is a popular goal because research has shown that when combined with other healthy behaviors, it can lead to a decrease in chronic illness like diabetes, metabolic syndromes and heart disease. Exercise does not need to be done in consecutive minutes. You can walk for 30 to 60 minutes once a day or you can do activities two to three times a day in 10- to 20-minute increments.”

Halt the salt

The WHO formulated a Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) Action Plan for 2013-2020, with the goal of decreasing premature death from heart disease, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, and diabetes by 25% by 2025. Among their recommendations is reducing salt intake.

The WHO calls for a 30% relative reduction in the mean population intake of salt or sodium in those aged 18 years or older. In other words, adults should consume less than 5 grams of salt or 2 grams of sodium daily.

Keep in mind that salt-laden foods don’t necessarily taste salty. High salt content lurks in canned vegetables, canned soups, fast food, cold cuts, and cheese. When in doubt, read the labels for salt and calorie content.

Limit the spirits

The WHO also calls for a 10% reduction in alcohol consumption to curb the health risks of drinking. In particular, it stresses the dangers of heavy episodic (ie, binge) drinking among adolescents and adults.

The agency notes that harmful use of alcohol “encompasses the drinking that causes detrimental health and social consequences for the drinker, the people around the drinker and society at large, as well as the patterns of drinking that are associated with increased risk of adverse health outcomes.”

For those who like to occasionally imbibe, it may be a good idea to drink smarter. Healthier alcohol choices include hard liquors—which are low in sugar and calories—as well as wine and champagne, which are full of polyphenols and antioxidants. (Champagne is essentially sparkling wine.)

Take your nutraceuticals

Nutraceuticals such as ginger, curcumin, and green tea can curb the incidence of metabolic syndrome, as well as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. 

Green tea, for example, decreased levels of body fat and drops body weight. In a study published in the Journal of Research in Medical Science, researchers found that patients with type 2 diabetes who drank 4 cups of green tea daily experienced significant decreases in average body weight (73.2 kg to 71.9 kg); BMI (27.4 to 26.9); systolic blood pressure (126.2 to 118.6); and waist circumference (95.8 cm to 91.5 cm).

How to prepare and protect your gut health over Christmas and the silly season

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How to prepare and protect your gut health over Christmas and the silly season

December 21, 2020 8.12am AEDT

Author

  1. Claus T. Christophersen Senior Lecturer, Edith Cowan University

Disclosure statement

Claus T. Christophersen receives funding from NHMRC and WA Department of Health. He is a co-author of The Gut Feeling Cookbook linked in this article – all proceeds from sales of this cookbook go directly back into supporting our research, no personal financial interest.

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It’s that time of year again, with Christmas parties, end-of-year get-togethers and holiday catch-ups on the horizon for many of us — all COVID-safe, of course. All that party food and takeaway, however, can have consequences for your gut health.

Gut health matters. Your gut is a crucial part your immune system. In fact, 70% of your entire immune system sits around your gut, and an important part of that is what’s known as the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which houses a host of immune cells in your gut.

Good gut health means looking after your gut microbiome — the bacteria, fungi, viruses and tiny organisms that live inside you and help break down your food — but also the cells and function of your gastrointestinal system.

We know gut health can affect mood, thanks to what’s known as the gut-brain axis. But there’s also a gut-lung axis and a gut-liver axis, meaning what happens in your gut can affect your respiratory system or liver, too.

Join 130,000 people who subscribe to free evidence-based news.

Here’s what you can do to bolster your gut microbiome in the coming weeks and months. https://www.youtube.com/embed/YB-8JEo_0bI?wmode=transparent&start=0


Read more: Gut health: does exercise change your microbiome?


How do silly season indulgences affect our gut health?

You can change your gut microbiome within a couple of days by changing your diet. And over a longer period of time, such as the Christmas-New Year season, your diet pattern can change significantly, often without you really noticing.

That means we may be changing the organisms that make up our microbiome during this time. Whatever you put in will favour certain bacteria in your microbiome over others.

We know fatty, sugary foods promote bacteria that are not as beneficial for gut health. And if you indulge over days or weeks, you are pushing your microbiome towards an imbalance.

A group of friends clink drinks while wearing Christmas gear.
For many of us, Christmas is a time of indulgence. Shutterstock

Is there anything I can do to prepare my gut health for the coming onslaught?

Yes! If your gut is healthy to begin with, it will take more to knock it out of whack. Prepare yourself now by making choices that feed the beneficial organisms in your gut microbiome and enhance gut health.

That means:

  • eating prebiotic foods such as jerusalem artichokes, garlic, onions and a variety of grains and inulin-enhanced yoghurts (inulin is a prebiotic carbohydrate shown to have broad benefits to gut health)
  • eating resistant starches, which are starches that pass undigested through the small intestine and feed the bacteria in the large intestine. That includes grainy wholemeal bread, legumes such as beans and lentils, firm bananas, starchy vegetables like potatoes and some pasta and rice. The trick to increasing resistant starches in potato, pasta and rice is to cook them but eat them cold. So consider serving a cold potato or pasta salad over Christmas
  • choosing fresh, unprocessed fruits and vegetables
  • steering clear of added sugar where possible. Excessive amounts of added sugar (or fruit sugar from high consumption of fruit) flows quickly to the large intestine, where it gets gobbled up by bacteria. That can cause higher gas production, diarrhoea and potentially upset the balance of the microbiome
  • remembering that if you increase the amount of fibre in your diet (or via a supplement), you’ll need to drink more water — or you can get constipated.

For inspiration on how to increase resistant starch in your diet for improved gut health, you might consider checking out a cookbook I coauthored (all proceeds fund research and I have no personal interest).

Good gut health is hard won and easily lost. Shutterstock

What can I do to limit the damage?

If Christmas and New Year means a higher intake of red meat or processed meat for you, remember some studies have shown that diets higher red meat can introduce DNA damage in the colon, which makes you more susceptible to colorectal cancer.

The good news is other research suggests if you include a certain amount of resistant starch in a higher red meat diet, you can reduce or even eliminate that damage. So consider a helping of cold potato salad along with a steak or sausage from the barbie.

Don’t forget to exercise over your Christmas break. Even going for a brisk walk can get things moving and keep your bowel movements regular, which helps improve your gut health.

Have a look at the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and remember what foods are in the “sometimes” category. Try to keep track of whether you really are only having these foods “sometimes” or if you have slipped into a habit of having them much more frequently.

The best and easiest way to check your gut health is to use the Bristol stool chart. If you’re hitting around a 4, you should be good.

An image of the Bristol stool chart
If you’re hitting around a 4, you should be good. Shutterstock

Remember, there are no quick fixes. Your gut health is like a garden or an ecosystem. If you want the good plants to grow, you need to tend to them — otherwise, the weeds can take over.

I know you’re probably sick of hearing the basics — eat fruits and vegetables, exercise and don’t make the treats too frequent — but the fact is good gut health is hard won and easily lost. It’s worth putting in the effort.

A preventative mindset helps. If you do the right thing most of the time and indulge just now and then, your gut health will be OK in the end.

Melatonin.

I have started taking Melatonin 4 mg Sustained release as I have been on it before and it is the right dose for me. However, for those of you requesting a script, it is better I start you on a slightly lower dose of 3 mg sustained release. If you tolerate that well, then I can increase the next script to 4 mg. If you get vivid dreams, or wake up drowsy, then you would be better off on a lower dose of 2 mg. It is just a matter of working out the right dose for each person, to get the maximum benefit.

Melatonin supplementation to improve quality of life for elderly cancer patients

Angeline Ginzac

Université Clermont Auvergne, INSERM, U1240 Imagerie Moléculaire et Stratégies Théranostiques, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France

Délégation Recherche Clinique & Innovation, Centre Jean Perrin, F-63011 Clermont-Ferrand, France

Emilie THIVAT

Université Clermont Auvergne, INSERM, U1240 Imagerie Moléculaire et Stratégies Théranostiques, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France

Délégation Recherche Clinique & Innovation, Centre Jean Perrin, F-63011 Clermont-Ferrand, France

Xavier Durando

Université Clermont Auvergne, INSERM, U1240 Imagerie Moléculaire et Stratégies Théranostiques, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France

Délégation Recherche Clinique & Innovation, Centre Jean Perrin, F-63011 Clermont-Ferrand, France

DOI: 10.15761/ICM.1000148ArticleArticle InfoAuthor InfoFigures & Data

Abstract

The incidence of elderly population living with cancer increases. Maintaining or improving the quality of life (QoL) has become an important goal in the treatment of cancer disease and is even an endpoint in clinical trials. The elderly are underrepresented within these clinical trials and often undertreated. The aged population with cancer is very heterogeneous and has certain characteristics (comorbidities, vulnerability) making the management and assessment of QoL more complex in this population.

Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, regulates various physiological functions and is involved in the initiation of sleep. With age, the secretion of melatonin decreases and thus disrupts circadian rhythm. Circadin® (a prolonged-release form of melatonin) is used in France in the treatment of primary insomnia in person over 55 years old and contributes to improvement of QoL. Melatonin also presents a potential interest in addition to chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer by reducing or preventing certain symptoms (e.g., fatigue, depression) that constitute essential components of QoL. In this context, it seems appropriate to study the impact of supplementation with melatonin during chemotherapy on QoL of elderly patients with metastatic cancer

More on Melatonin.

This is a blog I posted last year about the cancer preventative actions of Melatonin. I have had a very positive response of my blog last week about Melatonin and memory. I have started Melatonin 4 mg SR as well (Follow my own advice).

. Melatonin: An Anti-Tumor Agent in Hormone-Dependent Cancers.

Nov 11

Posted by Dr Colin Holloway

I have discussed the benefits of melatonin many times. One of its major benefits is its anti cancer properties. It is also very safe and natural to the body.

Int J Endocrinol. 2018 Oct 2;2018:3271948. doi: 10.1155/2018/3271948. eCollection 2018.

Melatonin: An Anti-Tumor Agent in Hormone-Dependent Cancers.

Menéndez-Menéndez J1, Martínez-Campa C1.

Author information

Abstract

Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a hormone synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland mainly during the night, since light exposure suppresses its production. Initially, an implication of this indoleamine in malignant disease was described in endocrine-responsive breast cancer. Data from several clinical trials and multiple experimental studies performed both in vivo and in vitro have documented that the pineal hormone inhibits endocrine-dependent mammary tumors by interfering with the estrogen signaling-mediated transcription, therefore behaving as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM). Additionally, melatonin regulates the production of estradiol through the control of the enzymes involved in its synthesis, acting as a selective estrogen enzyme modulator (SEEM). Many more mechanisms have been proposed during the past few years, including signaling triggered after activation of the membrane melatonin receptors MT-1 and MT-2, or else intracellular actions targeting molecules such as calmodulin, or binding intranuclear receptors. Similar results have been obtained in prostate (regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis and modulation of androgen receptor levels and activity) and ovary cancer. Thus, tumor metabolism, gene expression, or epigenetic modifications are modulated, cell growth is impaired and angiogenesis and metastasis are inhibited. In the last decade, many more reports have demonstrated that melatonin is a promising adjuvant molecule with many potential beneficial consequences when included in chemotherapy or radiotherapy protocols designed to treat endocrine-responsive tumors. Therefore, in this state-of-the-art review, we aim to compile the knowledge about the oncostatic actions of the indoleamine in hormone-dependent tumors, and the latest findings concerning melatonin actions when administered in combination with radio- or chemotherapy in breast, prostate, and ovary cancers.

As melatonin has no toxicity, it may be well deserve to be considered as an endogenously generated agent helpful in cancer prevention and treatment

Finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory

I have been promoting the benefits of Melatonin for a whole range of things, knowing it is safe and virtually devoid of side effects. In the USA it is available over the counter, but is on a prescription in Australia. You may see it on the counter in health food shops, but beware, as it is not the same thing. The Melatonin sold without a script in Australia is in doses of 2 mg, which is too low in my opinion for most of you. The amount needed to be effective varies from person to person, so is best done by a compounding chemist, made to order. It is available commercially on a script under the name Circadin. If any of my patients are interested in getting a script for Melatonin, either wait until you see me next and ask for it, or email me and I will send a script to your pharmacy. There may be a small fee to cover costs for this service.

Melatonin: Finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory

Newswise: Cognition and Learnings|December 10, 2020

Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) in Japan show that melatonin and its metabolites promote the formation of long-term memories in mice and protect against cognitive decline.

Chiba, Japan — Walk down the supplement aisle in your local drugstore and you’ll find fish oil, ginkgo, vitamin E, and ginseng, all touted as memory boosters that can help you avoid cognitive decline. You’ll also find melatonin, which is sold primarily in the United States as a sleep supplement. It now looks like melatonin marketers might have to do a rethink. In a new study, researchers led by Atsuhiko Hattori at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) in Japan have shown that melatonin and two of its metabolites help memories stick around in the brain and can shield mice, and potentially people, from cognitive decline.

One of the easiest ways to test memory in mice is to rely on their natural tendency to examine unfamiliar objects. Given a choice, they’ll spend more time checking out unfamiliar objects than familiar ones. The trick is that for something to be familiar, it has to be remembered. Like in people, cognitive decline in mice manifests as poor memory, and when tested on this novel object recognition task, they behave as if both objects are new.

The group of researchers at TMDU were curious about melatonin’s metabolites, the molecules that melatonin is broken down into after entering the body. “We know that melatonin is converted into N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) in the brain,” explains Hattori, “and we suspected that they might promote cognition.” To test their hypothesis, the researchers familiarized mice to objects and gave them doses of melatonin and the two metabolites 1 hour later. Then, they tested their memory the next day. They found that memory improved after treatment, and that AMK was the most effective. All three accumulated in the hippocampal region of the brain, a region important for turning experiences into memories.

For young mice, exposure to an object three times in a day is enough for it to be remembered the next day on the novel object recognition task. In contrast, older mice behave as if both objects are new and unfamiliar, a sign of cognitive decline. However, one dose of AMK 15 min after a single exposure to an object, and older mice were able to remember the objects up to 4 days later.

Lastly, the researchers found that long-term memory formation could not be enhanced after blocking melatonin from being converted into AMK in the brain. “We have shown that melatonin’s metabolite AMK can facilitate memory formation in all ages of mice,” says Hattori. “Its effect on older mice is particularly encouraging and we are hopeful that future studies will show similar effects in older people. If this happens, AMK therapy could eventually be used to reduce the severity of Mild Cognitive Impairment and its potential conversion to Alzheimer’s disease.”

The article, “The melatonin metabolite N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine facilitates long-term object memory in young and aging mice,” was published in Journal of Pineal Research at DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jpi.12703.

Here is a more detailed information about the study, for those keen to delve into the nitty-gritty of research.

Melatonin: finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory

10-Dec-2020 10:30 AM EST, by Tokyo Medical and Dental UniversityEdit Institutionfavorite_border

Newswise: Melatonin: finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory

Department of Biology,TMDU

Three 1-minute training trials (A) revealed age-associated object memory decline in middle-aged and old mice at 1 day post-training (B). Systemic AMK (1 mg/kg) administered after a single 1-minute training trial enhanced object memory at 1 and 4 days post-training in all age groups (D-F). Data are presented as mean ± standard error. *P < .05 and **P < .01 indicate significantly different than chance performance (50%). Discrimination index (%) = time exploring novel object/ total object exploration time during test X 100

Newswise — Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) in Japan show that melatonin and its metabolites promote the formation of long-term memories in mice and protect against cognitive decline.

Chiba, Japan — Walk down the supplement aisle in your local drugstore and you’ll find fish oil, ginkgo, vitamin E, and ginseng, all touted as memory boosters that can help you avoid cognitive decline. You’ll also find melatonin, which is sold primarily in the United States as a sleep supplement. It now looks like melatonin marketers might have to do a rethink. In a new study, researchers led by Atsuhiko Hattori at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) in Japan have shown that melatonin and two of its metabolites help memories stick around in the brain and can shield mice, and potentially people, from cognitive decline.

One of the easiest ways to test memory in mice is to rely on their natural tendency to examine unfamiliar objects. Given a choice, they’ll spend more time checking out unfamiliar objects than familiar ones. The trick is that for something to be familiar, it has to be remembered. Like in people, cognitive decline in mice manifests as poor memory, and when tested on this novel object recognition task, they behave as if both objects are new.

The group of researchers at TMDU were curious about melatonin’s metabolites, the molecules that melatonin is broken down into after entering the body. “We know that melatonin is converted into N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) in the brain,” explains Hattori, “and we suspected that they might promote cognition.” To test their hypothesis, the researchers familiarized mice to objects and gave them doses of melatonin and the two metabolites 1 hour later. Then, they tested their memory the next day. They found that memory improved after treatment, and that AMK was the most effective. All three accumulated in the hippocampal region of the brain, a region important for turning experiences into memories.

For young mice, exposure to an object three times in a day is enough for it to be remembered the next day on the novel object recognition task. In contrast, older mice behave as if both objects are new and unfamiliar, a sign of cognitive decline. However, one dose of AMK 15 min after a single exposure to an object, and older mice were able to remember the objects up to 4 days later.

Lastly, the researchers found that long-term memory formation could not be enhanced after blocking melatonin from being converted into AMK in the brain. “We have shown that melatonin’s metabolite AMK can facilitate memory formation in all ages of mice,” says Hattori. “Its effect on older mice is particularly encouraging and we are hopeful that future studies will show similar effects in older people. If this happens, AMK therapy could eventually be used to reduce the severity of Mild Cognitive Impairment and its potential conversion to Alzheimer’s disease.

What is overdiagnosis and why should we take it seriously in cancer screening?

Public Health Res Pract. 2017 Jul 26;27(3). pii: 2731722. doi: 10.17061/phrp2731722.

What is overdiagnosis and why should we take it seriously in cancer screening?

Carter SM1, Barratt A2.

Author information

Abstract

Overdiagnosis occurs in a population when conditions are diagnosed correctly but the diagnosis produces an unfavourable balance between benefits and harms. In cancer screening, overdiagnosed cancers are those that did not need to be found because they would not have produced symptoms or led to premature death. These overdiagnosed cancers can be distinguished from false positives, which occur when an initial screening test suggests that a person is at high risk but follow-up testing shows them to be at normal risk. The cancers most likely to be overdiagnosed through screening are those of the prostate, thyroid, breast and lung. Overdiagnosis in cancer screening arises largely from the paradoxical problem that screening is most likely to find the slow-growing or dormant cancers that are least likely to harm us, and less likely to find the aggressive, fast-growing cancers that cause cancer mortality. This central paradox has become clearer over recent decades. The more overdiagnosis is produced by a screening program, the less likely the program is to serve its ultimate goal of reducing illness and premature death from cancer. Thus, it is vital that health professionals and researchers continue an open, scientific inquiry into the extent and consequences of overdiagnosis, and devise appropriate responses to it.

Low-Dose Naltrexone: An Inexpensive Medicine for Many Ills?

News > Medscape Medical News > Features

We had a severe storm on Tuesday, which damaged our Telecommunications at the Clinic. The result was many of you could not get through by phone, and those that did found the line was very poor. This meant I have had to reschedule my cancelled telephone consults. I apologize for this but it was out of my control.

I finish work tomorrow, and will be back in the middle of January. This has been a very busy week, on thing or another, so I have been slow on answering emails, due to the amount of them I am receiving at present. I will get around to them, but some patience and understanding is required. Very few doctors allow patients to email them and provide assistance in that way. Over the holiday period, i will be available by email for any urgent problems that may arise.

I have been using LDN (see below) for the last 5 years, and found it generally to be safe and effective in many medical conditions, as many of you have found.

Low-Dose Naltrexone: An Inexpensive Medicine for Many Ills?

Miriam E. Tucker

March 11, 2020

Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) could represent a low-cost and safe alternative treatment for several chronic neurologic, rheumatologic, psychiatric, and gastrointestinal inflammatory conditions, recent findings suggest.  

The opioid antagonist naltrexone is currently approved in 50 mg tablet doses for the treatment of opioid and alcohol dependence. But at much lower doses — typically 1.5 mg to 12 mg — it appears to operate uniquely as an anti-inflammatory agent in the central nervous system, via action on microglial cells. The low-dose version is not currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, so to be used it must be prescribed off-label and specially compounded.

Given that it’s off-patent and costs only about $25 to $65 a month (at US compounding pharmacies), there’s little financial incentive for pharmaceutical companies to conduct large randomized clinical trials of LDN.

However, accumulating data from a variety of sources suggest that it’s relieving pain and other symptoms of several different chronic inflammatory conditions, with few side effects other than mild and transient nausea, insomnia, headache, and vivid dreams.

One recent three-patient series published in BMJ Case Reports is the latest to describe successful use of LDN in relieving not just pain, but also fatigue, cognitive impairment, and post-exertional malaise in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), a debilitating neuroimmune condition for which there are no currently approved treatments.

Another case series published in November reports similar benefits in ME/CFS, and clinicians who specialize in the illness have endorsed its use based on their cumulative anecdotal experience.

Indirect evidence for LDN’s benefits comes from a unique series of articles published in the last few years from Norway, reporting the impact of a surge in LDN prescribing in that country in 2013 following the airing of a television documentary about LDN.

According to Norway’s nationwide prescribing database, about 15,297 patients, or 0.3% of the country’s population, was prescribed LDN by physicians following the airing of the documentary. Over the next year, there were dramatic drops in prescriptions for high-cost drugs used in the treatment of rheumatoid and seropositive arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, epilepsy, psychotic conditions, and depression.

Jarred W. Younger, PhD, who has studied LDN in fibromyalgia and is seeking funding to study it in ME/CFS, told Medscape Medical News, “We really need clinical trials to show what it works for [ME/CFS] and how to use it properly.”

“A lot of clinicians are trying it without enough guidance,” added Younger, who is director of the Neuroinflammation, Pain and Fatigue Lab at the University of Alabama, Birmingham

Feeling sore after exercise? Here’s what science suggests helps (and what doesn’t)

Feeling sore after exercise? Here’s what science suggests helps (and what doesn’t)

December 3, 2020 12.55pm AEDT

Authors

  1. Andrea Mosler Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, La Trobe University
  2. Matthew Driller Associate Professor, Sport and Exercise Science, La Trobe University

Disclosure statement

Andrea Mosler is supported by an National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship

Matthew Driller does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

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Have you been hitting the gym again with COVID restrictions easing? Or getting back into running, cycling, or playing team sports?

As many of you might’ve experienced, the inevitable muscle soreness that comes after a break can be a tough barrier to overcome.

Here’s what causes this muscle soreness, and how best to manage it.

What is muscle soreness and why does it occur?

Some muscle soreness after a workout is normal. But it can be debilitating and deter you from further exercise. The scientific term used to describe these aches is delayed onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, which results from mechanical disruption of the muscle fibres, often called “microtears”.

This damage causes swelling and inflammation in the muscle fibres, and the release of substances that sensitise the nerves within the muscle, producing pain when the muscle contracts or is stretched.

This pain usually peaks 24-72 hours after exercise. The type of exercise that causes the most muscle soreness is “eccentric” exercise, which is where force is generated by the muscle as it lengthens — think about walking downhill or the lowering phase of a bicep curl.

Athletic man suffering from shoulder pain
Soreness in the days after exercise is normal, and actually results in stronger muscles. Shutterstock

There’s good news about this pain though. When the muscle cell recovers from this “microtrauma”, it gets stronger and can produce that force again without the same damage occurring. So although this strengthening process is initially painful, it’s essential for our body to adapt to our new training regime.

The inflammatory component of this process is necessary for the muscle tissue to strengthen and adapt, therefore the repeated use of anti-inflammatory medication to manage the associated pain could be detrimental to the training effect.

Will recovery gadgets put me out of my misery? Not necessarily

Before we even think about recovery from exercise, you first need to remember to start slow and progress gradually. The body adapts to physical load, so if this has been minimal during lockdown, your muscles, tendons and joints will need time to get used to resuming physical activity. And don’t forget to warm up by getting your heart rate up and the blood flowing to the muscles before every session, even if it’s a social game of touch footy!


Read more: Heading back to the gym? Here’s how to avoid injury after coronavirus isolation


Even if you do start slow, you may still suffer muscle soreness and you might want to know how to reduce it. There are heaps of new recovery gadgets and technologies these days that purport to help. But the jury is still out on some of these methods.

Some studies do show a benefit. There have been analyses and reviews on some of the more common recovery strategies including ice baths, massage, foam rollers and compression garments. These reviews tend to support their use as effective short-term post-exercise recovery strategies.

So, if you have the time or money — go for it! Make sure your ice baths are not too cold though, somewhere around 10-15℃ for ten minutes is probably about right.

And a word of caution on ice baths, don’t become too reliant on them in the long term, especially if you are a strength athlete. Emerging research has shown they may have a negative effect on your muscles, blunting some of the repair and rebuilding processes following resistance training.

A man floating in a float tank
New recovery methods and gadgets are marketed everywhere, but most of them require further research. Shutterstock

But the efficacy of other recovery strategies remain unclear. Techniques like recovery boots or sleeves, float tanks and cryotherapy chambers are newer on the recovery scene. While there have been some promising findings, more studies are required before we can make an accurate judgement.

However, these recovery gadgets all seem to have one thing in common: they make you “feel” better. While the research doesn’t always show physical benefits for these techniques or gadgets, often using them will result in perceived lower levels of muscle soreness, pain and fatigue.

Is this just a placebo effect? Possibly, but the placebo effect is still a very powerful one — so if you believe a product will help you feel better, it probably will, on some level at least.

The ‘big rocks’ of recovery

Some of the above techniques could be classified as the “one-percenters” of recovery. But to properly recover, we need to focus on the “big rocks” of recovery. These include adequate sleep and optimal nutrition.

Sleep is one of the best recovery strategies we have, because this is when most of the muscle repair and recovery takes place. Ensuring a regular sleep routine and aiming for around eight hours of sleep per night is a good idea.

An elderly lady in bed sleeping
Ultimately, adequate sleep and optimal nutrition are the best ways to recover after exercise. Shutterstock

When it comes to nutrition, the exact strategy will vary from person to person and you should always seek out nutrition advice from a qualified professional, but remember the three R’s:

  • refuel (replacing carbohydrates after exercise)
  • rebuild (protein intake will aid in the muscle repair and rebuilding)
  • rehydrate (keep your fluid intake up, especially in these summer months!).

Enjoy your newfound freedom when returning to sport and exercise, but remember to focus on a slow return, and to make sure you’re eating and sleeping healthily before spending your hard-earned cash on the hyped-up recovery tools you may see athletes using on Instagram.