At menopause, weight, exercise, education, income play big roles in metabolic risks

At menopause, weight, exercise, education, income play big roles in metabolic risks

The North American Menopause Society News, 12/21/2015

Study underscores strong need for weight management before menopause. At midlife, overweight and obesity, lack of exercise, less education, and low income put women at much higher risk of having metabolic syndrome, the cluster of conditions predisposes people to diabetes and heart disease, shows a large study published in Menopause. The researchers from Yonsei University in Seoul and Hallym University in Chuncheon, Korea, analyzed four years of data from the Korean Genetic Epidemiologic Survey on some 1,200 healthy women 45 to 55 years old who did not use hormones and looked for characteristics that predisposed the women to having metabolic syndrome or developing it as they went through menopause. For the women overall in the study, transitioning through menopause or becoming postmenopausal (reaching or exceeding 1 year after their final period) during the study did not significantly increase the risk of metabolic syndrome. But for overweight, obese, sedentary, undereducated, and disadvantaged women, the picture was very different. In contrast to normal–weight women, overweight women in the study had more than 4 times the risk and obese women more than 12 times risk of metabolic syndrome. Women who didn’t exercise had a 1.6 times greater risk than exercisers. For the women who were in perimenopause, the time of irregular periods before menopause, those who were overweight had 3 times the risk of normal weight women for metabolic syndrome, and those who were obese had 9 times the risk. Overweight women who became postmenopausal during the study had 3 times and obese women 8.5 times greater risk than those with normal body weight. And postmenopausal women who did not exercise had a 1.6 times greater risk than high–level exercisers. For women in the study who had less than 10 years of education, the risk of metabolic syndrome was 1.4 times greater than for more educated women, and the risk for low income women was 1.6 to 1.7 times greater than for wealthier women. Among the women who experienced menopause during the study, those who did not have more than a high–school education had 1.7 times the risk of better educated women. In addition, disadvantaged women who went through menopause during the study had 2.5 times the risk and middle–income women 2 times the risk of their wealthier counterparts.

About Dr Colin Holloway

Gp interested in natural hormone treatment for men and women of all ages

Posted on June 22, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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