Risk of breast cancer by type of menopausal hormone therapy

I have been discussing the issues of HRT and breast cancer over the last week, as it is such an important issue for women, and something that needs to be understood. The studies done have generally used the synthetic, one-size -fits-all , HRT often given as a pill. That is the reason for the raised Breast Cancer risk. The study below (one of many I have) shows the point I have been making – women must use the micronised, natural progesterone, as it does not increase the breast cancer risk. Unfortunately, micronised progesterone is not available commercially in Australia, and can only be provided by a compounding chemist. Which is why you wont be offered it by your Specialist or GP. Sad, isn’t it.

PLoS One. 2013 Nov 1;8(11):e78016. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078016. eCollection 2013.

Risk of breast cancer by type of menopausal hormone therapy: a case-control study among post-menopausal women in France.

Cordina-Duverger E1, Truong T, Anger A, Sanchez M, Arveux P, Kerbrat P, Guénel P.

Author information

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is extensive epidemiological evidence that menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) increases breast cancer risk, particularly combinations of estrogen and progestagen (EP). We investigated the effects of the specific formulations and types of therapies used by French women. Progestagen constituents, regimen (continuous or sequential treatment by the progestagen), and time interval between onset of menopause and start of MHT were examined.

METHODS:

We conducted a population-based case-control study in France in 1555 menopausal women (739 cases and 816 controls). Detailed information on MHT use was obtained during in-person interviews. Odds ratios and 95% confidence interval adjusted for breast cancer risk factors were calculated.

RESULTS:

We found that breast cancer risk differed by type of progestagen among current users of EP therapies. No increased risk was apparent among EP therapy users treated with natural micronized progesterone. Among users of EP therapy containing a synthetic progestin, the odds ratio was 1.57 (0.99-2.49) for progesterone-derived and 3.35 (1.07-10.4) for testosterone-derived progestagen. Women with continuous regimen were at greater risk than women treated sequentially, but regimen and type of progestagen could not be investigated independently, as almost all EP combinations containing a testosterone-derivative were administered continuously and vice-versa. Tibolone(Livial) was also associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Early users of MHT after onset of menopause were at greater risk than users who delayed treatment.

CONCLUSION:

This study confirms differential effects on breast cancer risk of progestagens and regimens specifically used in France.

Formulation of EP therapies containing natural progesterone, frequently prescribed in France, was not associated with increased risk of breast cancer 

Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2014 Aug;290(2):207-9. doi: 10.1007/s00404-014-3270-0.

Is breast cancer risk the same for all progestogens?

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Berne, Bern, Switzerland, petra.stute@insel.ch.

Abstract

The population-based case–control study CECILE investigated the impact of various menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) products on breast cancer (BC) risk in 1,555 postmenopausal women [1]. The case group (n = 739) included incident cases of in situ (!) or invasive BC in postmenopausal women. The control group (n = 816) included women from the general population within predefined quotas by age and socio-economic status (SES). While quotas by age were applied to obtain similar distributions by age among controls and among cases, quotas by SES in control women were applied to reflect the distribution by SES of women in the general population in the study area. Data of participants were obtained by a structured questionnaire during in-person interviews, and from pathology reports if applicable, respectively. Women were divided into current and past MHT user. MHTs were classified in estrogen-only therapy (ET), estrogen combined with progestin therapy (EPT) and tibolone. EPT was subdivided in three subtypes according to the progestogen constituent: natural micronized progesterone, progesterone derivatives, and testosterone derivatives. In comparison to never MHT users, any current or past MHT use (ET, EPT, tibolone) was not associated with an increased BC risk. However, in subanalysis BC risk was significantly increased for current use of EPT for 4 or more years (n = 73 cases and n = 56 controls, adjusted OR 1.55; 95 % CI 1.02–2.36). Within the group of current EPT users for 4 or more years, 14 cases had used estrogens combined with micronized progesterone (n = 17 controls), and 55 a combination with a synthetic progestogen (n = 34 controls), respectively. Compared to never MHT use, current use of EPT containing a synthetic progestogen for 4 or more years was associated with a significantly increased BC risk (adjusted OR 2.07; 95 % CI 1.26–3.39), but EPT containing micronized progesterone was not (adjusted OR 0.79; 95 % CI 0.37–1.71). 73 % of current MHT users started treatment within the first year of onset of menopause. Early EPT (n = 52 cases and n = 38 controls, adjusted OR 1.65; 95 % CI 1.02–2.69), but not early ET, starters had a significantly higher BC risk compared to never MHT users. In contrast, MHT initiation beyond 1 year after menopause was not associated with an increased BC risk.

The authors concluded that: (1) ET and EPT containing natural progesterone did not increase BC risk whereas, (2) BC risk was increased in users of tibolone(Livial) or EPT containing a synthetic progestogen, respectively, and that (3) MHT use early after onset of menopause was associated with an increased BC risk as compared to women who delay MHT beyond 1 or more years.

About Dr Colin Holloway

Gp interested in natural hormone treatment for men and women of all ages

Posted on December 2, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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