Blood-type diet does not work

I have always been very sceptical of the blood type diet, but at least  the author of the book did very well from the book, so at least someone benefited from this diet.  Here is some research on this diet.

 

17 January 2014, 12.18pm AEST

Blood-type diet does not work

The diet suggesting that nutritional needs vary according to blood type does not work, a study has found.

The way an individual responds to a diet based on blood-type has nothing to do with their blood-type but instead their ability to stick to a low-carbohydrate or vegetarian diet.

The study involved 1,455 participants.

ABO Genotype, ‘Blood-Type’ Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

  • Jingzhou Wang,
  • BibianaGarcía-Bailo,
  • Daiva E. Nielsen,
  • AhmedEl-Sohemy mail
  • Published: January 15, 2014
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0084749

Abstract

Background

The ‘Blood-Type’ diet advises individuals to eat according to their ABO blood group to improve their health and decrease risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. However, the association between blood type-based dietary patterns and health outcomes has not been examined. The objective of this study was to determine the association between ‘blood-type’ diets and biomarkers of cardiometabolic health and whether an individual’s ABO genotype modifies any associations.

Methods

Subjects (n = 1,455) were participants of the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health study. Dietary intake was assessed using a one-month, 196-item food frequency questionnaire and a diet score was calculated to determine relative adherence to each of the four ‘Blood-Type’ diets. ABO blood group was determined by genotyping rs8176719 and rs8176746 in the ABO gene. ANCOVA, with age, sex, ethnicity, and energy intake as covariates, was used to compare cardiometabolic biomarkers across tertiles of each ‘Blood-Type’ diet score.

Results

Adherence to the Type-A diet was associated with lower BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, serum cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA-IR and HOMA-Beta (P<0.05). Adherence to the Type-AB diet was also associated with lower levels of these biomarkers (P<0.05), except for BMI and waist circumference. Adherence to the Type-O diet was associated with lower triglycerides (P<0.0001). Matching the ‘Blood-Type’ diets with the corresponding blood group did not change the effect size of any of these associations. No significant association was found for the Type-B diet.

Conclusions

Adherence to certain ‘Blood-Type’ diets is associated with favorable effects on some cardiometabolic risk factors, but these associations were independent of an individual’s ABO genotype, so the findings do not support the ‘Blood-Type’ diet hypothesis.

About Dr Colin Holloway

Gp interested in natural hormone treatment for men and women of all ages

Posted on July 6, 2014, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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